Berries Big Health Benefits in Small Packages

Berries Big Health Benefits in Small Packages

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Berries Big Health Benefits in Small Packages:

Berries Big Health Benefits in Small Packages:

In many studies of connections between specific fruits and vegetables and disease risk, one group of foods kept rising to the top: berries. Several studies have linked eating these tasty fruits, especially blueberries, to lower risks of heart disease, memory loss, diabetes, estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and more. Berries are no miracle food, mind you, and eating them can’t undo the harms caused by less-than healthful food choices. But sprinkled on cereal, added to a fruit salad, munched as a snack, and turned into low-sugar desserts, berries can be a terrific addition to your diet.

In many studies

In many studies of connections between specific fruits and vegetables and disease risk, one group of foods kept rising to the top: berries.

Several studies

Several studies have linked eating these tasty fruits, especially blueberries, to lower risks of heart disease,
Eating more fruits

Berries Big Health Benefits in Small Packages

Berries Big Health Benefits in Small Packages

Berries Big Health Benefits in Small Packages

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Beating high blood pressure with food

Beating high blood pressure with food

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Beating high blood pressure with food

Beating high blood pressure with food

The term “blood pressure” has gotten a bad reputation. You need some pressure to move blood from the heart to the brain and the toes and back again. But too much pressure is harmful. It damages artery walls, which can lead to a heart attack or stroke. High blood pressure can weaken the heart muscle over time and damage other organs, like the kidneys and the eyes. About 90 percent of Americans develop high blood pressure during their lifetimes. Most people can keep their blood pressure in the healthy range by staying lean and physically active, consuming five or ¬diagnosed with high blood pressure (also known as hypertension), there are several things you can do to keep your blood pressure in check without the need for medication. And even if you do need medication, these strategies can help minimize the number of drugs needed to keep blood pressure under control, which in turn will reduce both the side affects you feel and the cost of your treatment. If you have high blood pressure and are overweight, losing just 5 to 10 percent of your starting weight can help lower your blood pressure and do much, much more for your health. Eating more fruits and vegetables delivers extra potassium, which helps control blood pressure. Aim for a minimum of five servings a day and remember: potatoes and corn don’t count as vegetables. Cutting back on sodium (a main part of table salt) will also help you control your blood pressure. Try to keep your sodium intake under 1,500 milligrams, the amount in three-quarters of a teaspoon of salt. You don’t need to count milligrams of salt on a meal-by-meal basis, but it is helpful to know where most of your salt comes from, particularly because so much of it is hidden in processed and prepared foods. Suddenly decreasing the amount of salt (sodium) may make your diet seem bland. But if you cut back slowly, you won’t notice that you are taking in less salt. Most natural foods are low in sodium, so if you limit your intake of processed foods and don’t load up on salt when cooking, your sodium intake will be low without your thinking about it. Keeping your blood pressure in check, whether by diet or drugs, is an important way to protect yourself from having a heart attack or stroke.

My Approach

If you have high blood pressure and are overweight, losing just 5 to 10 percent of your starting weight can help lower your blood pressure and do much, much more for your health.

Eating more fruits and vegetables

Eating more fruits and vegetables delivers extra potassium, which helps control blood pressure.
Eating more fruits
Sports Nutrition
Weight Loss
Vitamins & Suppliments

there are several things you can do to keep your blood pressure in check without the need for medication.

there are several things you can do to keep your blood pressure in check without the need for medication.

there are several things you can do to keep your blood pressure in check without the need for medication.

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WHY WE GAIN WEIGHT

WHY WE GAIN WEIGHT

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WHY WE GAIN WEIGHT

WHY WE GAIN WEIGHT

Your weight depends on a simple but easily unbalanced equation: weight change equals calories in minus calories out over time. Burn as many calories as you take in and your weight won’t change. Take in more than you burn and your weight increases. Dieting explores the other end of the spectrum: burning more calories than you take in.
Chalk up why you’re the weight you are to a combination of what and how much you eat, your genes, your lifestyle, and your culture.
Your diet. What and how much you eat affects your weight. I’ll talk about that in the future.
• Genes. Your parents are partly to blame or to thank, for your weight and the shape of your body. Studies of twins raised apart show that genes have a strong influence on gaining weight or being overweight, meaning that some people are genetically predisposed to gaining weight. Heredity plays a role in the tendency to store fat around the chest, waist, or thighs. It is possible that some people are more sensitive to calories from fat or carbohydrates than others, although the evidence for this is thin. I must stress the phrase “partly to blame,” however because genetic influences can’t explain the rapid increase in obesity seen in the United States over the last thirty years or the big differences in obesity rates among countries.
It’s likely that our prehistoric ancestors shaped our physiological and behavioral responses to food. Early humans routinely coped with feast-or-famine conditions. Since it was impossible to predict when the next good meal might appear—like a patch of ripe berries or a catchable antelope—eating as much as possible whenever food was available might have been a key to surviving the lean times. This survival adaptation means that complex chemical interactions between body and mind that evolved eons ago in response to routine periods of starvation may drive us to eat whenever possible. In this era of plenty, that means all the time.
• Lifestyle and physical activity. If eating represents the pleasurable, sensuous side of the weight change equation, then metabolism and physical activity are its noseto- the-grindstone counterparts. Your resting (basal) metabolism is the energy needed just to breathe, pump and circulate blood, send messages from brain to body, maintain your temperature, digest food, and keep the right amount of tension in your muscles. It typically accounts for 60 to 70 percent of your daily energy expenditure. Physical activity makes up most of the rest. If you work a desk job and do little more than walk from your car to your office and back again, you may burn ridiculously few calories a day.

Culture

Ours is a culture of living large, of Texas-size appetites where quantity often edges out quality. Indulgence is tolerated, even revered. Love is food, and food is love: Imagine your grandmother urging you to have another helping or the pleasurable groans and belt loosening that end many holidays and regular meals. These are not universal tendencies. In France and throughout much of Asia, the cuisine emphasizes quality and presentation, not how much food can be crammed on a plate or into your belly. People in many cultures also believe it is inappropriate or downright rude to eat until you are full, and teach their children to eat to 70 percent of capacity.

Family and friends.

. Our family and friends, where we work and play, and other social factors strongly influence what and how much we eat. Making healthy choices can be challenging when everyone around is filling up on sugary soda and pizza and no healthful foods are insight. In the next article, we also describe how individuals can change or circumvent the factors working against them, for their own well-being and for those around them.

Your microbiome.

Billions of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and other microbes— collectively called your microbiome—live quietly inside your intestines. They help digest your food; protect you against microbes that can cause disease; make vitamins such as vitamin B12, thiamine, and riboflavin; and more. It’s possible but unproven that your microbiome helps regulate your weight. Some types of gut bacteria seem to be better at releasing calories from food or causing inflammation, either of which can lead to weight gain. But we still don’t know if the microbiome is causing weight gain or weight gain is changing the microbiome.

WHY WE GAIN WEIGHT

WHY WE GAIN WEIGHT

WHY WE GAIN WEIGHT

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Top 10 Most Popular diets

Top 10 Most Popular diets

TOP 10 MOST POPULAR DIETS

TOP 10 MOST POPULAR DIETS
DIETS
There are thousands of diets. Some are for losing weight, while others are for gaining weight, lowering cholesterol, living a long and healthful life, and many other reasons.
A diet is best described as a fixed plan of eating and drinking where the type and amount of food are planned out in order to achieve weight loss or follow a particular lifestyle.
The following diets are covered in this diet review:

1. Ketogenic Diet
2. Atkins Diet
3. Vegan and Vegetarian Diets
4. Mediterranean Diet
5. Paleo Diet
6. Zone Diet
7. Low-FODMAP Diet
8. High Protein Diets
9. DASH Diet
10. Very-low-calorie Diet

 The following diets are covered in this diet review:

Ketogenic diet
  •  Ketogenic diets are low in carbs and high in fat, which puts the body in a state of ketosis. The “keto” diet is all the rage these days, but what exactly is a ketogenic diet? The keto diet is a short-term, low carb and high fat (LCHF) diet that focuses on weight loss. On this diet, your calorie breakdown looks like this: 70-75% fat, 20-25% protein, and 5-10% carbs. Ketosis is a metabolic state that happens when your body doesn’t have enough carbohydrates for your cells to burn for energy. So, instead, it burns fat. The Keto diet is very effective at slimming your waistline but does cause huge changes to your body that aren’t always positive. This diet has risks including ketoacidosis for people with type 1 diabetes, however, and may result in diabetic coma and death. Although most studies are 2 years or less, there is some promising research in relation to diabetes management, metabolic health, weight loss, and body composition change. U.S. News & World Report says that changing the way your body is fueled from carbs to fat can lead to leg cramps, dehydration, brain fog, dizziness and more.
Vegan and Vegetarian Diets
While both vegan and vegetarian diets cut out all animal protein, there is one distinct difference between the two: animal products. Vegetarians can eat anything except meats and seafood, but vegans follow a strictly plant-based diet and avoid any food that comes from an animal. This includes meats, seafood, dairy, eggs, and some vegans omit honey as well.

Although a vegan diet is more difficult to follow than a vegetarian diet, it is becoming increasingly easier to find positively delicious vegan recipes, vegan products in grocery stores, and quality vegan restaurants. Since vegetarian and vegan diets have proven benefits in managing diabetes and reducing heart disease risks, it is great that they are becoming more accessible.

Whether you try one of these two diets for health, environmental impact, religious beliefs, or the treatment of animals, make sure to get a good balance of nutrition and think about taking a supplement with calcium, zinc, and vitamin D and B12.

Paleo Diet
In its purest form, the Paleolithic diet more commonly known as the paleo diet or the “caveman diet” allows only those foods that humans ate when we first roamed the planet, half a million years ago: Fish, lean meats, fruit, nonstarchy veggies, and nuts are in; starchy veggies, dairy foods, grains, and processed foods are out. Because of its straightforward guidelines, focus on nutrient-rich produce, and emphasis on exercise, the paleo diet has earned a loyal following among fans who say it helps them not only lose weight but get and stay healthier. However, experts say the long-term results aren’t proven and the diet is difficult to maintain.

The aim of a paleo diet is to return to a way of eating that’s more like what early humans ate. The diet’s reasoning is that the human body is genetically mismatched to the modern diet that emerged with farming practices an idea known as the discordance hypothesis.

Low FODMAP Diet
A low FODMAP diet that reduces or removes certain foods can help some people avoid abdominal (tummy) pain and discomfort.

FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides; Disaccharides; Monosaccharides; and Polyols. These are the chemical names of several sugars that are poorly absorbed in the small intestine.

The sugars can trigger symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in some people, such as diarrhea, flatulence (passing wind), abdominal bloating, pain, nausea and constipation. These symptoms can affect people’s lives and make them feel uncomfortable, causing stress and embarrassment.

A low FODMAP diet reduces or removes certain everyday foods that are high in FODMAPs. These include some grains, vegetables, fruits, and dairy products.

Very-low-calorie Diet
The use of very-low-calorie diets (VLCDs) is sometimes considered for weight management in the NHS (National Health Service) and in commercial programs. There is a need for long-term comparison with conventional dietary interventions to assess clinical effectiveness. VLCDs are defined as hypocaloric diets that provide between 450 to 800 kcal per day and are relatively enriched in the protein of high biological value. They must contain the full complement of vitamins, minerals, electrolytes, and fatty acids. They are usually in a liquid formulation and are intended to completely replace another food intake in a weight loss program for a specific period of time. The diet usually involves replacing normal food with low-calorie shakes, soups, bars, or porridge containing milk.VLCDs are typically for adults who are obese defined as having a BMI over 30 but should not be the first option to manage obesity. These diets should only be followed under medical supervision for a maximum of 12 weeks continuously, or intermittently with a low-calorie diet for example, for two to four days a week.

Most people who want to lose weight do not need to follow a very low-calorie diet.

Reference
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK311324/https://www.amazon.com/DASH-Diet-Mediterranean-Solution-Control/dp/1538715252https://www.health.harvard.edu/diet-and-weight-loss/a-new-diet-to-manage-irritable-bowel-syndrome.https://www.amazon.com/Krauses-Food-Nutrition-Process-Therapy/dp/032334075Xhttps://nutrition.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk426/files/…/fact-pro-paleo-diet.pdfhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3916858/
Atkins diet
The Atkins diet, or Atkins nutritional approach, focus on controlling the levels of insulin in the body through a low-carbohydrate diet.

If people consume large amounts of refined carbohydrates, their insulin levels rise and fall rapidly. Rising insulin levels trigger the body to store energy from the food that is consumed, making it less likely that the body will use stored fat as a source of energy.

The theory of Atkins is that through the low-calorie intake, users burn fat stores for energy and therefore see weight loss as a result of this. It is also claimed that advocates will develop steady sugar levels throughout the diet, whereas other dietary methods are high in carbs which can cause fluctuations between blood sugar levels. Through steady fueling throughout the day, Atkin users are also less likely to feel hungry, which is a common vex of many diets.

Dr. Atkins developed this low-carb diet to help people lose a substantial amount of weight and make their bodies healthier. By limiting carbohydrates (glucose), the body will burn fat for fuel instead and will have a more consistent level of energy and blood sugar. The Atkins diet is also helpful in lowering cholesterol, but if you need to drastically alter your cholesterol, you may want to look into the Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLC) Diet that is endorsed by the American Heart Association.

Mediterranean diet
A Mediterranean diet incorporates the traditional healthy living habits of people from countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea, including France, Greece, Italy, and Spain. The Mediterranean diet varies by country and region, so it has a range of definitions. But in general, it’s high in vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, beans, cereals, grains, fish, and unsaturated fats such as olive oil. It usually includes a low intake of meat and dairy foods.

The Mediterranean diet has been linked with good health, including a healthier heart. The Mediterranean Diet is associated with a lower incidence of mortality from all-causes and is also related to a lower incidence of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, certain types of cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Zone Diet
The Zone diet was developed by Barry Sears, Ph.D., and The Zone became a best-selling diet book. The idea behind the Zone diet is that those who follow it will reset their metabolism, warding off heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic health conditions.

Dieters follow a “30-30-40” breakdown to help control insulin levels and hunger, getting 30 percent of their calories from protein, 30 percent from fat, and 40 percent from carbohydrates. Devotees give the Zone diet praise for variety and ease of use, though others warn that the popular diet plan can feel restrictive and is light on certain nutrients.

DASH diet
The healthy DASH diet plan was developed to lower blood pressure without medication in research sponsored by the US National Institutes of Health, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The first research showed that DASH could lower blood pressure as well as the first line blood pressure medications, even with a sodium intake of 3300 mg/day! Since then, numerous studies have shown that the DASH diet reduces the risk of many diseases, including some kinds of cancer, stroke, heart disease, heart failure, kidney stones, and diabetes. It has been proven to be an effective way to lose weight and become healthier at the same time. It is full of fabulous, delicious, real foods.

The DASH Diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, whole grains, fish, poultry, beans, seeds, and nuts. It also contains less sodium; sweets, added sugars, and beverages containing sugar; fats; and red meats than the typical American diet. This heart-healthy way of eating is also lower in saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol and rich in nutrients that are associated with lowering blood pressure—mainly potassium, magnesium, calcium, protein, and fiber.

Diabetes Recommendations

Diabetes Recommendations

Meta Description:

Meta Description:

How can nutrition aid diabetes management?

Meta Description: Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Prevented or Delayed with Lifestyle Changes:

According to the Diabetes Prevention Program study: modest weight loss (7% of body weight) + physical activity (30 minutes per day) = 58% reduction in risk for type 2

Keywords: diabetes mellitus, nutrition recommendations, glycemic control, insulin.

Diabetes mellitus is a disease with varying forms and degrees that have the common characteristic of

hyperglycemia. Its underlying metabolic disorder involves all three of the energy-yielding nutrients and

influences energy balance. The most important hormone that controls increased levels of blood glucose is insulin that secrets from the pancreas. people with diabetes have either a lack of insulin or a resistance to its action.

Type 1 and 2 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes affects approximately 5% to 10% of all people with diabetes; It commonly occurs for the first time during childhood, and it is more severe and unstable compared to type 2. The treatment of type 1 diabetes involves regular meals and snacks that are balanced with insulin and exercise. The self-monitoring of blood glucose levels is a critical part of disease management.

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly among adults, especially those who are overweight. Treatment involves weight reduction and maintenance along with regular exercise. Oral hypoglycemic medications or insulin may be needed.

 Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Prevented or Delayed with Lifestyle Changes:

Modest weight loss (7% of body weight) + physical activity (30 minutes per day) = 58% reduction in risk for type 2

A key point to remember is that preventing or delaying type 2 diabetes requires only small changes in lifestyle. Notice that success doesn’t mean starving yourself to reach an “ideal body weight” or running endless laps. A 7% weight loss is equivalent to losing 14 pounds for someone who weighs 200 pounds. Moderate-intensity physical activity equates to taking a brisk walk for about 30 minutes each day, five days a week.

These goals are small steps toward the bigger reward of good health. As you take these small steps and experience small successes, you will develop more confidence in yourself and your ability to make the changes you need to stay healthy.

 Body Weight in Type 2 Diabetes

Because excessive body fat can worsen insulin resistance, weight loss is recommended for overweight or obese individuals who have diabetes. Even moderate weight loss (5 to 10 percent of body weight) can help to improve insulin resistance, glycemic control, blood lipid levels, and blood pressure. Weight loss is most beneficial early in the course of diabetes before insulin secretion has diminished. Not all persons with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Older adults and those in long-term care facilities are often underweight and may need to gain weight. Low body weight increases the risks of morbidity and mortality in these individuals.

Physical Activity and Diabetes Management

Regular physical activity can improve glycemic control considerably and is, therefore, a central feature of disease management. Physical activity also benefits other aspects of health, including cardiovascular risk factors and body weight. Children with diabetes or prediabetes should engage in at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day. Adults with diabetes are advised to perform at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, spread over at least 3 days of the week; they should also perform resistance exercise at least twice weekly unless contraindicated by a medical condition that increases the risk of injury. Both aerobic and resistance exercise can improve insulin sensitivity.

According to the Diabetes Prevention Program study:

Nutrition Recommendations for the Management of Diabetes

Total Carbohydrate Intake The amount of carbohydrate consumed has the greatest influence on blood glucose levels after meals. the more grams of carbohydrate ingested, the greater the glycemic response. The carbohydrate recommendation is based in part on the person’s metabolic needs, the type of insulin or other medications used to manage diabetes, and individual preferences. For optimal health, the carbohydrate sources should be whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits, and milk products, whereas foods made with refined grains and added sugars should be limited.

  • Monitoring carbohydrate levels—whether by carbohydrate counting, exchanges or experienced-based estimation—is a key strategy for the achievement of glycemic control.
  • Sucrose-containing foods can be substituted by other carbohydrates in the meal plan. if they added to the meal plan, they must be considered with regard to the dosage of insulin or other glucose-lowering medications. Be careful to avoid excess energy intake.
  • As for the general population, people with diabetes are encouraged to consume a variety of fiber-containing foods to meet dietary recommendations.
  • Sugar alcohols and nonnutritive sweeteners are safe when they are consumed according to the daily intake levels established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
  • Fructose from natural foods such as fruit may result in better glycemic control compared to the isocaloric intake of sucrose or starch. Avoid sugar-sweetened beverages (including those made with high-fructose corn syrup).
Fat
  • The amount of dietary saturated fat, cholesterol, and trans fat recommendations are the same as those for the general population.
  • Increase the selection of foods containing omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) and omega-3 linolenic acid (ALA).
  • Two or more servings of fish per week (with the exception of commercially fried fish filets) provide omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and are recommended.
  • For people with type 2 diabetes, a Mediterranean-style, monounsaturated fatty acid-rich eating pattern may improve glycemic control and prevent cardiovascular disease risk factors.
  • Individuals with diabetes and dyslipidemia may be able to modestly reduce total and LDL-cholesterol by consuming 1.6 to 3 g/day of plant stanols or sterols typically found in enriched foods.
Protein
  • For individuals with diabetes and normal renal function, the evidence is insufficient to suggest any special recommendations. usual protein intake (i.e., 15% to 20% of energy) should be modified.
  • For individuals with type 2 diabetes, ingested protein can increase the insulin response without increasing plasma glucose concentrations. Therefore, carbohydrate foods that are also high in protein should not be used to prevent or treat acute hypoglycemia.
Sodium
  • For individuals with both diabetes and hypertension, a reduction in dietary sodium should be less than the general public. (≤2300 mg/day is advisable.)
Alcohol Use in Diabetes
  • recommendations for alcohol intake is similar to those for the general population, which recommends that women and men limit their average daily intakes of alcohol to one drink and two drinks per day, respectively.

    • Be aware that alcohol consumption may put people with diabetes at risk of delayed hypoglycemia, especially if taking insulin or insulin secretagogues.
Micronutrient
  • recommendations for people with diabetes are the same as for the general population. Vitamin and mineral supplementation is not recommended unless nutrient deficiencies develop; those at risk include the elderly, pregnant or lactating women, strict vegetarians, and individuals on calorie-restricted diets.
Whole Grains and Fiber
  • Recommendations for whole grain and fiber intakes are similar to those for the general population. People with diabetes are encouraged to include fiber-rich foods such as whole-grain cereals, legumes, fruits, and vegetables in their diet. There are no reasons for these individuals to consume greater amounts of fiber than what is recommended for the general public. Current recommendations are to consume approximately 25 g/day for women and 38 g/day for men.

Stress

Physiologic or psychosocial stress may affect glycemic control in patients with diabetes because of the hormonal responses that are antagonistic to insulin. In particular, diabetes-specific emotional stress is associated with poor HbA1c control in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes, especially those who use insulin, should learn useful stress-reduction exercises and activities as part of their self-care skills and practices. Stress-reducing activities can vary greatly from one person to the next (e.g., meditation, running, yoga, journaling, playing music). Finding the best coping mechanism may require trial and error.

Conclusion

Conclusion

Medical nutrition therapy for people with diabetes should be individualized, with consideration given to the individual’s usual food and eating habits, metabolic profile, treatment goals, and desired outcomes. Monitoring of metabolic parameters, including glucose, HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, and renal function, when appropriate, as well as the quality of life, is essential to assess the need for changes in therapy and to ensure successful outcomes.