Weight loss beginning with what you drink

Weight loss beginning with what you drink

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Weight loss beginning with what you drink

Weight loss beginning with what you drink

1. Drink plenty of water. It is recommended that you drink eight glasses per day, but that may take you some time to work up to. Your body needs a whole lot of water. Water doesn’t just flush all the toxins out of your body, but it makes you feel better and healthier. When you drink a lot of water, you just begin to feel fit, and this is the motivation you need to lose weight. 2. Start your day with a fresh, clean glass of water. As soon as you get up in the morning, drink one down. This will help your body to get going because it won’t be fighting through dehydration. Also, after you drink a glass of water, you won’t need to eat such a large breakfast. 3. Drink a glass of water before you sit down to eat. Water will naturally make you feel fuller, so you don’t have to eat as much food. 4. Do your best to stay away from soda. All sodas are sweetened with lots of sugar. The more you can cut out of your diet, the better. Also, diet soda is still soda. It may not have as much sugar, but it has other chemicals and components that are not good for your body either. 5. Fruit juice isn’t as healthy as most people think, either. Juice actually has a lot of sugar in it as well. If you are craving a glass of juice, drink fresh fruit juice instead of juice that has artificial flavors and coloring. 6. If you can say no to alcohol, then that is best. Alcohol beverages are not exactly good for you, although a glass of red wine does have heart benefits, most are just fattening. Beer is especially fattening. Cocktails are fattening, depending on what they are made of.

7. If you must have alcohol, try dry wine.

Dry wine is better than your sweet wines because sweet wines have more sugar! Dry wines have sugar, but most of it has been fermented away into alcohol, and from a weight gaining perspective, dry is better.

8. Avoid drinking excessive amounts of coffee

as it desensitizes your body to the natural fat-burning effects that caffeine has. One or two cups (if the days really slow to get started) max.

9. Drink green tea.

It aids the digestive system and can help ease an overly full stomach, and it has been linked to a reduction in cancer risk. But for weight loss, the essential nutrient in green tea, EGCG, maintains high norepinephrine levels in your body to keep your metabolism revved up.

Weight loss beginning with what you drink

Weight loss beginning with what you drink

Weight loss beginning with what you drink

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Vitamin C Everything You Need to Know

Vitamin C Everything You Need to Know

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Vitamin C: Everything You Need to Know

Vitamin C: Everything You Need to Know

Do you reach for an orange, a glass of orange juice, or a vitamin C tablet at the first sign of a cold? If so, you aren’t alone. It’s an impulse nudged by Vitamin C and the Common Cold, written in 1970 by Linus Pauling, a double Nobel laureate and self-proclaimed champion of vitamin C. Pauling fervently believed that megadoses of vitamin C—between 1,000 and 2,000 milligrams a day (the amount in twelve to twenty-four oranges!) could prevent and abort colds . . . and could do the same for cancer.
There’s no question that vitamin C plays a role in fighting infection. It helps make collagen, a substance you need for healthy bones, ligaments, teeth, gums, and blood vessels. It helps make several hormones and chemical messengers used in the brain and nerves. It is also a potent antioxidant that can neutralize the tissue-damaging free radicals that assail the body.
We’ve known for almost two hundred years that citrus fruits prevent scurvy, a once-feared disease that killed an estimated 2 million sailors between 1500 and 1800. It wasn’t until 1932, though, that vitamin C was discovered and found to be the active agent in citrus fruits responsible for fighting scurvy.

Can high doses of vitamin C fight other diseases?

Not the common cold: study after study has failed to prove Pauling’s proposition.
There’s a smattering of evidence that a little extra vitamin C, about the amount found in a typical multivitamin, at the very beginning of a cold might relieve some symptoms, but there’s no support for megadoses.

Prevent cancer and heart disease?

The evidence is thin, and most studies don’t support that. It’s possible that some extra vitamin C might help prevent cataract formation, but here again, more research is needed.

Recommended intake:

Recommended intake: The current recommended dietary allowance for vitamin C is 75 milligrams a day for women and 90 milligrams a day for men, with an extra 35 milligrams a day for smokers. As the evidence continues to unfold, I suggest getting 200 to 300 milligrams of vitamin C a day. This is easy to do with a good diet and a standard multivitamin pill.

Good food sources

Good food sources of vitamin C are citrus fruits and juices, berries, green and red peppers, tomatoes, broccoli, and spinach. Many breakfast cereals are also fortified with vitamin C.

Safety:

Safety:

There seems to be no harm in getting more, although the latest dietary reference intake report on vitamin C cautions against taking megadoses above 2,000 milligrams a day. But there’s really no need to overdo vitamin C. Your body can’t store much of it (about 1,500 to 3,000 milligrams at a time) and flushes out the excess in bright yellow urine. What’s more, there’s no evidence that big daily doses help. At high concentrations, vitamin C can switch roles and act like a free radical instead of an antioxidant and theoretically could cause the things you may be trying to prevent.

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Nutrition, physical activity, and cardiovascular disease

Nutrition, physical activity, and cardiovascular disease

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Nutrition, physical activity, and cardiovascular disease

Nutrition, physical activity, and cardiovascular disease

Heart disease accounts for 1 out of 4 deaths in the United States each year and costs over $207 billion per year when considering the cost of health care, medications, and lost productivity. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death across most ethnic and racial groups in the United States, with coronary artery disease (CAD), the most common type of heart disease, killing 365,000 people in 2014. Globally, CVD causes 17.3 million deaths per year. Preventive treatment that includes dietary patterns with emphasis on types of fat, physical activity, and lifestyle interventions can prevent and help treat CVD through their effects on modifiable risk factors such as hypertension, weight, and blood lipid parameters.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Two or more servings per week of fatty fish are associated with 30% to 45% reduced risk of death from cardiac events in the general population. This benefit is attributed to the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Suggested mechanisms of EPA and DHA include a modest decrease in atherosclerosis, blood pressure, left ventricular mass, and heart rate with an increase in stroke volume. The Evidence Analysis Library (EAL) recommendation for omega-3 FAs for the prevention of heart disease is two 4-ounce servings of fatty fish per week. In patients with heart disease, the advice increases to two or more 4-ounce servings of fatty fish per week. The dose of 1 g/day EPA + DHA has been shown to decrease the risk of death from cardiac events in patients with heart disease.

Nut

Nuts can be recommended as a source of unsaturated fat that may help to improve dyslipidemia when used to replace saturated/trans fats. The Evidence Analysis Library (EAL) states that there is fair evidence to suggest that the consumption of 5 ounces of nuts per week is associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction (MI), based on results from the Nurses’ Health Study.

Added sugar

Added sugar contributes to weight gain, which is a risk factor for dyslipidemia. The AHA recommends reducing added sugar to no more than 100 calories per day for women and 150 calories per day for men. Medical nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia includes the identification and reduction of sugars and syrups that are added to foods during processing, preparation, or at the table.

Physical Activity:

As a part of Medical nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia, the Evidence Analysis Library (EAL) recommends at least 2 days/week of resistance exercise and moderate-intensity physical activity for at least 30 minutes on most days of the week. The AHA/ACC guidelines for Cardiovascular disease prevention recommend physical activity 3 to 4 times per week for an average of 40 minutes at moderate to vigorous intensity. This level of physical activity can reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) by 3 to 6 mg/dL. The AHA/ACC concludes that the entire population of the United States was physically active; the incidence of CHD could be reduced by 6%.

Nutrition, physical activity, and cardiovascular disease

Nutrition, physical activity, and cardiovascular disease

Nutrition, physical activity, and cardiovascular disease
Ref
1. Kusumoto FM. Cardiovascular disorders: Heart disease. In: Hammer GD, McPhee SJ, eds. Pathophysiology of Disease: An Introduction to Clinical Medicine. 7th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2013. 2. Mozzafarian D, Benjamin EJ, Go AS, et al. on behalf of the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee. Heart disease and stroke statistics—2016 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation.2016;133:e38-e360. 3. Mozaffarian D, Benjamin EJ, Go AS, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics— 2015 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2015;131:e29-322. 4. Eckel RH, Jakicic JM, Ard JD, et al. 2013 AHA/ACC Guideline on Lifestyle Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk. A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. Circulation. 2014;129:S76-S99. 5. Dietary fats and cardiovascular disease. A presidential advisory of the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2017;135. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000510 6. Mohrman DE, Heller L. The peripheral vascular system. In: Mohrman DE, Heller L, eds. Cardiovascular Physiology. 8th ed. NewYork,NY:McGrawHill;2014.http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com.ezproxy.library.tufts.edu/content.aspx?bookid=843&Sectionid=48779654 Accessed October 4, 2017.

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How to Boost Your Immune System During the Coronavirus Outbreak.

How to Boost Your Immune System During the Coronavirus Outbreak.

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How to Boost Your Immune System During the Coronavirus Outbreak?

Avoid excessive alcohol consumption.

Numerous studies have found a link between excessive alcohol consumption and immune function. Research shows people who drink in excess are more susceptible to respiratory illness and pneumonia and recover from infection and wounds more slowly. Alcohol alters the number of microbes in the gut microbiome, a community of microorganisms that affect the immune system. Excessive drinking can damage the lungs and impair the mucosal immune system, which is essential in helping the body recognize pathogens and fight infection.

Check your vitamin D level.

Vitamin D can be found in fatty fish, such as salmon. In milk or foods fortified with vitamin D. In general, our vitamin D levels tend to be influenced by sun exposure, skin tone, and latitude — people in northern areas who get less sun exposure in the winter typically have lower vitamin D. A blood test is required to check vitamin D levels. Less than 20 nanograms per milliliter are considered deficient. The above 30 is optimal. If you are concerned about immune health, you may consider having your vitamin D level checked and talking to your doctor about whether to take a supplement.

Lower your stress.

Your body does a better job fighting off illness and healing wounds when it’s not under stress. Learning techniques for managing stress, like meditation, yoga, controlled breathing, or talking to a therapist are all ways to help your immune system stay strong.

Eat a balanced diet and skip unproven supplements.

A healthy diet and exercise are essential to maintaining a strong immune system. However, no single food or natural remedy has been proven to bolster a person’s immune system or ward off disease.

How to Boost Your Immune System During the Coronavirus Outbreak?

How to Boost Your Immune System During the Coronavirus Outbreak?

How to Boost Your Immune System During the Coronavirus Outbreak?
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Healthy Eating for Seniors

Healthy Eating for Seniors

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ealthy Eating for Seniors

Supplements must be safe because they’re natural.

NOT ALWAYS. Plants and other natural products have been used for thousands of years to maintain health and treat illness, and many are helpful. However, you should never assume that just because a health product is “natural,” it is automatically “safe.” Like conventional drugs, herbal medicines and other natural products may have potentially serious side effects or trigger allergic reactions. These supplements may also affect how your prescription drugs work. Talk to your doctor before you take any supplements, including herbal or botanical supplements, Chinese, Ayurvedic, or other traditional medicines. You should do this, especially if you have a medical condition. Your doctor can tell you which supplements may be helpful, which may have adverse side effects and how the supplements will interact with any medications you may be taking. You should also speak with your pharmacist before taking any supplements.

Calcium and vitamin D

Calcium works together with other bone-building nutrients – particularly vitamin D, which helps your body absorb calcium – to maintain strong and healthy bones and teeth. Eating foods rich in calcium and vitamin D throughout your life, combined with regular physical activity, will help prevent osteoporosis. With osteoporosis, your bones become smaller, more fragile, and more likely to break. In Canada, one in four women and one in eight men over the age of 50 have osteoporosis. Recent studies have also shown that eating foods rich in calcium and vitamin D will help protect against muscle weakness, which in turn will help prevent falls. Seniors should consume 1200 mg of calcium and 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D a day from food sources and/or supplements. Seniors over 70 years of age may require up to 800 IU a day. If you already have osteoporosis, your doctor may recommend even higher amounts of calcium and vitamin D.

I’m too old to exercise.

False. You are never too old for physical activity. Even if you are in your 80s or 90s, staying active will help you feel better and do the things you want to do. You should work towards 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity every day, but it does not have to be all at once. For example, you could try walking for 10 minutes in the morning, and another 10 in the afternoon, with a short stretch before and after and a little gardening or vacuuming in between. You can also alternate walking days with days where you do some strength training – lifting light weights, such as soup cans, for example. And if you can’t do 30 minutes, even 10 minutes of light physical activity a day will help you feel more vibrant, energetic, and alert.

All fats are bad.

False. Research now proves that it is not fat that is bad for you, but the type of fat you eat that counts most. Everyone needs to eat some fat to stay healthy. Fat supplies your body with energy and helps build a protective coat around your cells – but it’s got to be healthy fat and in the right amount. Unhealthy fats are saturated and trans fats. Saturated fats are mostly found in food that comes from animals. They are also found in palm and coconut oils. Trans fats come mostly from vegetable oils that have been made solid through a process called hydrogenation. unhealthy fats are found in: -whole or full-fat milk, including coconut milk and Hong Kong-style milk tea -cream, sour cream, and ice cream -butter and clarified butter or ghee -fatty red meat (sausage, pork hock, bacon, Chinese preserved meats) – chicken feet, chicken, duck and turkey skin or fat – dim sum (including pork pastry, potstickers, and sticky rice wraps)
Healthy fats are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. One type of polyunsaturated fat – omega 3 fatty acid – is particularly helpful in reducing the “stickiness” of your blood, so you are less likely to develop clots. Omega 3 fatty acids also help lower triglycerides, reducing your risk of heart disease and stroke. Healthy fats are found in: -oily or fatty fish*, such as salmon, anchovies, rainbow trout, sardines, mackerel, eulachon, char, and herring -nuts and seeds, such as cashews, almonds, walnuts*, peanuts and ground flaxseeds* -vegetable oils, including olive, peanut, canola*, soybean*, and sesame oil and soft-tub margarine made from these oils (provided they have “non-hydrogenated” on the label) -flaxseed and walnut oils* (do not heat these oils; use them cold) -wheatgerm -avocadoes, and -foods fortified with omega 3, including eggs, yogurt, and soy beverages. * * These items are all particularly high in omega 3 fatty acids.

Healthy Eating for Seniors

Healthy Eating for Seniors

Healthy Eating for Seniors
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Four Simple Food Environment “Home Improvements”

Four Simple Food Environment “Home Improvements”

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Four Simple Food Environment “Home Improvements”

Four Simple Food Environment “Home Improvements”

The steps you take toward a healthier home food environment need not be extreme. Here are four small steps you can take today. 1. Ditch the sugary soda: It may seem simple, but for some households, this may be easier said than done. A Gallup poll, the results of which were published in July 2012, found that nearly half of Americans drink soda daily. This despite the fact that most of us certainly know by now that drinking it regularly, is not the best thing we could be doing for ourselves. While plain water is an ideal alternative, many other low-calorie or no-calorie alternatives exist that might soften the blow of a no-cola policy in your home. Club soda, for instance, gives the same fizzy feeling with no calories. Add a bit of lemon or lime, and you may not have the sugary jolt you had before, but you will still have a refreshing beverage in your hand.

2. Banish bad foods to the back:

Is it all too easy to reach for sugary snacks when you want them? Consider relocating these snacks to a less convenient area of the fridge, cabinets, or kitchen pantry. In their place, substitute healthier options—fresh-cut vegetables and fruit, refreshing yogurt, or whole wheat snacks. Knowing that the less-healthy snacks are still available may help make the switch seem less restrictive, but you will also know that a healthy option is always close at hand. On the other hand, some of us find it easier to keep the cookies and candy out of the house because our ability to resist temptation is too low.

3. Out with the white foods, in with the brown:

One of the easiest swaps you can make in your cupboard may be whole grain pasta and brown rice instead of their refined counterparts. These sources of carbohydrates are more filling and more nutritious, and they provide more nutrients with your meals. It may be an adjustment at first, but you might find that the change is worth making.

4. Capitalize on your free time to set yourself up to succeed:

When you aren’t hungry and have your food “wits” about you, prepare fruits, veggies, and protein snacks so that you can pick them up and go in the morning. Brown rice can be prepared, boiled, and frozen in individual containers and then warmed up during the week to accompany a healthy protein choice and some greens. Taking this extra time in advance helps minimize your excuses for not choosing wisely when it comes to nutrition.

Four Simple Food Environment “Home Improvements”

Four Simple Food Environment “Home Improvements”

Four Simple Food Environment “Home Improvements”
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